Health Care

How to improve outdoor workouts this summer, according to a celebrity trainer

Why you shouldn’t let the Coronavirus lockdown take away from getting in some outdoor workoutsVideo

Why you shouldn’t let the Coronavirus lockdown take away from getting in some outdoor workouts

With many fitness centers having to shut their doors in response to COVID-19, many people are looking for alternatives in getting a good sweat session. According to celebrity trainer and health expert Juliet Kaska, this is why why it’s more important than ever to get in some outdoor exercise during this outbreak.

Don’t break a sweat if the coronavirus pandemic upended your fitness routine, because summer is here and with it comes outdoor workout season.

Whether you’re a fitness fanatic jogging outdoors or gym-goer waiting to return to a favorite facility, there’s always room to improve your health and wellness game. Celebrity trainer Don Saladino told Fox News how to step up outdoor workouts for maximum results, why exercising outside can make all the difference and how to get toned, right at home.

WHAT WILL GYMS LOOK LIKE IN POST-QUARANTINE AMERICA? GOLD’S GYM, PLANET FITNESS WEIGH IN  

To begin, scout your turf to determine a safe, designated workout space

“You want to make sure that during the course of your workout you aren’t going to be coming into contact with too many unknown people or animals,” Saladino advised. “Be sure to investigate the area, even if it is your own lawn, for any sharp objects so you know your space is safe.”

“If you are going to a public place, making sure to wear a mask is important, and if you are going to be touching a step or bench for an exercise, try to bring training gloves you can clean after.”

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

From there, plan your sweat session. One easy way to get started? Sprints.

“I personally have enjoyed sprinting more during this time in my lawn. Sprinting is a great way to lower your blood pressure and build up fast-twitch muscles,” the celebrity trainer said “You can make it fun with your family by racing or seeing who can do the most back and forth.”

Of course, you could work it out from the comfort of your home – but it doesn’t offer some of the awesome perks that the great outdoors does.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

“There are some great benefits to training outdoors, including getting to do some of it barefoot on the grass. By doing this you are doing what some call ‘Earthing’ or ‘grounding,’” Saladino explained. “It connects us better with the environment, transferring electrons from the ground to the body, and has been shown to help with sleep and reducing pain.”

But before you venture out to soak up the sun and vitamin D, safely suit up with sunblock.

To truly kick things up a notch and stay accountable to your fitness goals, Saladino also suggested downloading a training app.

CLICK HERE FOR FOX NEWS’ CONTINUING CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

“First off, download a training program from a site or an app like mine on Playbook. There are so many great coaches out there that have designed programs that will help you improve without the need of gym equipment,” he said. “Or perhaps tune into a trainer that interests you online for an Instagram live.”

“Doing unique workouts that you aren’t familiar with can be fun, and make training more interesting,” the trainer, whose celebrity clients include Blake Lively, Ryan Reynold and Sebastian Stan, continued. “But I would say at a specific point you are going to want to find a multi-week program that fits your desires because if you just apply the same stimulus over and over again with one workout, you will plateau.”

Article source: http://feeds.foxnews.com/~r/foxnews/section/lifestyle/~3/AWqJUQrizSc/how-to-improve-outdoor-workouts-summer-celebrity-trainer

Related posts

Man who died in skateboarding accident saves 6 others through organ donation

Times of News

Hepatitis A outbreak in Colorado kills one, health officials say

Times of News

Pregnant millennials more likely to be depressed than previous generations, study says

Times of News